Anti-terror police in Kenya have accused the British of ignoring their warnings that Woolwich murder suspect Michael Adebolajo was a dangerous radical.

Adebolajo was arrested in Kenya in 2010 on suspicion of leading a jihadist plot to cross the border into lawless Somalia and join the ranks of the Al Shabaab terrorist group.

But the Kenyans claim that when they presented their evidence to the British Embassy, it was insisted Adebolajo had no criminal record.

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Michael Adebolajo in a Kenyan court in 2010 with five other men after he attempted to cross the border

Michael Adebolajo in a Kenyan court in 2010 with five other men after he attempted to cross the border

 
Adebolajo (centre in black top) was sent back to Britain after claiming he had been tortured in Kenya

Adebolajo (centre in black top) was sent back to Britain after claiming he had been tortured in Kenya.

And another Kenyan source yesterday claimed the British failed to help them build a case against Adebolajo.

Adebolajo was detained for several days before being deported to the UK.

It came as Adebolajo’s family claimed harassment by MI5 in the months before the attack may have ‘pushed him over the edge’.

On his return to the UK from Kenya, family members claim he was ‘pestered’ by MI5 agents who tried to recruit him as an informant and infiltrate Islamic extremist groups.

Adebolajo’s brother-in-law Abu Zuybyr claimed the intelligence services put Adebolajo under pressure to spy on Muslim clerics and become an informer.

Mr Zuybyr, who is married to Adebolajo’s sister Christiana, said: ‘That is what [Adebolajo’s] family is saying: that the secret service pushed him over the edge.’

He said Adebolajo was ‘elated’ following the birth of his child, but ‘then things became a little strange’.

The family of Adebolajo, pictured during a 2007 march in London, said he was harassed by MI5 in the months before the attack

The family of Adebolajo, pictured during a 2007 march in London, said he was harassed by MI5 in the months before the attack

Speaking to The Independent on Sunday, Mr Zuybyr said Adebolajo went to Nairobi in 2010 to study Arabic and Islam.

Following his return to England, Mr Zuybyr said authorities repeatedly questioned family members about Adebolajo.

His elder brother, Jeremiah, who had gone to Saudi Arabia to teach English, was arrested and quizzed. And Mr Zuybyr said he was questioned at gunpoint when he visited Yemen four years ago to learn Arabic with his wife.

He said: ‘When I came back to Britain, MI5 contacted me and showed significant interest in Michael. I was harassed for a while, with constant calls from people claiming to be from the FBI.’

In Kenya, Adebolajo was seized with five others after travelling by speedboat to an island off the coast near Lamu Island, 68 miles from the Somali border.

A married couple who owned a guest house where they had been staying and a worker were also arrested.

The Kenyans believed Adebolajo, 28, had played a crucial role in recruiting his co-accused, including two secondary school-aged boys, after they were radicalised during weekly visits to a mosque in Mombasa.

It is believed the Kenyan cleric Sheikh Aboud Rogo – who was killed by gunmen in Mombasa last year – had helped to fund the men.

Adebolajo was eventually deported without charge but the Kenyans insist they warned the British that he was dangerous.

Mombasa’s anti-terrorist police chief Elijah Rop said: ‘We advised the British police about the man but they ignored us.

‘That is the man we deported to the UK in 2010 after discovering he is among Islamic radicals who were recruited to train as Al Shabaab in Somalia three years ago.’

 
 
Rant: A man identified as Michael Adebolajo, 28, brandishes a meat cleaver with bloodied hands near the scene of the killing
Rant: A man identified as Michael Adebolajo, 28, brandishes a meat cleaver with bloodied hands near the scene of the killing
 

A man identified as Michael Adebolajo, 28, brandishes a meat cleaver with bloodied hands near the scene of the killing. It was claimed that MI5 offered Adebolajo a job six months ago

 

 
Adebolajo, right, is pictured at an English Defence League march in 2009

Adebolajo, right, is pictured at an English Defence League march in 2009

 

 
Michael Adebowale, 22, of Greenwich, South East London, was named last night as one of the suspects shot by police after the brutal murder of Lee Rigby

Michael Adebowale, 22, of Greenwich, south-east London, with a knife in his hand at the scene where Lee Rigby was stabbed to death

At the time of Adebolajo’s arrest, the security services were aware of the risk that radicalised British Muslims were heading to Somalia to join with Al Shabaab, which has links to Al Qaeda.

Only two months before, the then-head of MI5 Jonathan Evans had warned Britons were training in Somalia and it was ‘only a matter of time before we see terrorism on our streets inspired by those who are today fighting alongside Al Shabaab’.

It is now accepted that Al Qaeda cells in Mombasa were at their peak around 2010.

Samantha Lewthwaite, the fugitive ‘white widow’ of 7/7 bomber Germaine Lindsay is still on the run over her role in a suspected plot to bomb western hotels in the city.

However the security forces appear to have been relaxed that Adebolajo – who was travelling under the name of Michael Olemindis Ndemolajo – may have been prepared to train and fight with the brutal Al Shabaab.

Kenyan government spokesman Muthui Kariuki said: ‘We handed him to British security agents in Kenya and he seems to have found his way to London and mutated to Michael Adebolajo. The Kenyan government cannot be held responsible for what happened to him after we handed him to British authorities.’ 

 
 
Fallen hero: Father Lee Rigby, 25, from Manchester, was described as 'cheeky and humorous' in tributes. He was executed by two suspected Islamic terrorists in Woolwich on Wednesday afternoon

Father Lee Rigby was killed in the attack on Woolwich last week

 

 
Lee Rigby
Lee Rigby
 

Father of one and soldier Rigby, of Greater Manchester, pictured relaxing on Army leave

After their arrest Adebolajo  and the eight co-accused were taken to Mombasa and spent a number of days in prison before appearing before a magistrate.

Kenyan detectives suspected Adebolajo may have been a ringleader because he was most vocal in court and appeared to know how to ‘play the system’.

In court he claimed: ‘We are being tortured by police and we haven’t eaten for two days now.

‘We have been denied the right to talk to our family members and lawyer. We are being treated as criminals and we are innocent.’

The court told police it had three days to build a case but after the clean bill of health from the British embassy Adebolajo was deported.

Another Kenyan source yesterday accused the British of failing to help them build a case against Adebolajo. He said: ‘It was a major anti-terror investigation and we were given three days by the courts to build up a case.’

Last night the Foreign Office confirmed Adebolajo had been arrested in 2010 and it gave consular assistance ‘as normal’ in the circumstances.

A Foreign Office statement said: ‘We can confirm a British national was arrested in Kenya in 2010. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office provided consular assistance as normal for British nationals.’

 
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