A military police photographer has smuggled out of Syria evidence of the torture and killing of 11,000 detainees, according to a report by three former war crimes prosecutors.

The shocking images show emaciated corpses with strangulation marks, cuts, bruising and signs of electrocution – evidence of extreme torture, claim investigators. Some victims had no eyes.

The 55,000 photos will ratchet up the pressure on President Bashar Al Assad who the US and its Western allies – including the UK – say has committed war crimes against his own people.

Assad denies the claims, insisting he is fighting terrorists.

The 31-page report – released by The Guardian and CNN – was commissioned by Carter-Ruck solicitors in London on behalf of Qatar, a supporter of the Syrian uprising.

 
Shocking: This picture is one of 55,000 taken by a Syrian military police defector showing emaciated corpses which investigators say are evidence of extreme torture by Assad's regime. Photographs: The Report

Shocking: This picture is one of 55,000 taken by a Syrian military police defector showing emaciated corpses which investigators say are evidence of extreme torture by Assad’s regime. Photographs: The Report

 
Leverage: The report is being made available to the United Nations, governments and human rights groups just as peace talks are due to begin in Switzerland tomorrow to try to end the three-year conflict

Leverage: The report is being made available to the United Nations, governments and human rights groups just as peace talks are due to begin in Switzerland tomorrow to try to end the three-year conflict

 


The dossier is being made available to the United Nations, governments and human rights groups just as peace talks are due to begin in Switzerland tomorrow to try to end the three-year conflict.

The defector’s evidence records deaths of those in custody from March 2011 until August 2013. The photos were smuggled out along with files detailing the victims on memory sticks.

Three lawyers, all former prosecutors at the criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Sierra Leone, examined the evidence and said they found the defector, who goes by the name of Caesar, credible.

According to the report, he said his job was to take pictures of killed detainees, though he did not claim to have witnessed executions or torture.

 
Graphic: The defector's evidence, which records deaths of those in custody from March 2011 until August 2013, were smuggled out along with files detailing the victims on memory sticks

Graphic: The defector’s evidence, which records deaths of those in custody from March 2011 until August 2013, were smuggled out along with files detailing the victims on memory sticks

 

 

 

 
Dossier of evidence: The photos will ratchet up the pressure on President Bashar Al Assad who the US and its Western allies - including the UK - say has committed war crimes against his own people

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